Message from Alzheimers Society
Actions you could take to help your local community
We have been hearing from so many of you that your local area is full of people wanting to help and so we have put together some ideas together.
How could this impact people affected by dementia
We know that people living with dementia will all react in a unique way to the Coronavirus situation, however other people in your communities may not have the same level of knowledge about dementia so some key things you could tell them are:
– Someone living with dementia may not be aware of, or may forget about the Coronavirus outbreak, so may not always follow the social distancing recommendations.
– Many of our normal routines will change which may be particularly disruptive or upsetting for a person living with dementia as well as their families and carer(s).  
– Being isolated may be very difficult for people with dementia and for families caring for a person without access to support or respite.
– There are ways to help people to as live as well as they can by keeping connected and as active as possible
Simple actions you can inspire individuals in your community to take
– Get in touch with established groups who are already working to help the community to see how you could get involved. Start with your local Councillor.
– These established groups may benefit from understanding more about dementia. You could promote and encourage people to become Dementia Friends by watching the online video.    
– You can remind people in your community to keep in touch with those affected by dementia and their carers using video calling tools like SkypeFace Time and Zoom, and don’t forget the art of a good letter or postcard. 
– Simply picking up the phone and making sure people are okay is extremely powerful at this time.   
– You could help someone to order their shopping online if they don’t have internet access, or have not done it before.
– If you are visiting the shops pick up items for people or include them as part of a home delivery. Shopping locally may help – independent small shops may be able to help more than larger supermarkets: putting aside key supplies for people affected, or even delivering items.   
– If people need support and information encourage them to contact Alzheimer’s Society’s National Dementia Helpline – 0300 222 11 22   
– Keeping busy is important. Alzheimer’s Society bases all of our work on the experiences of people affected by dementia. You could promote Dementia Voice, which is an opportunity to get involved with us by having interesting conversations, share experiences and help influence change.
Simple actions businesses can take
– We have identified supermarkets and pharmacies to be two areas of main concern for people affected by dementia.
Supermarkets
– Keep bathroom facilities available for people who may need them
– Ask supermarkets/shops if they could have a designated morning exclusively for older/at risk individuals and carers
– Ask supermarkets if they could package things like soap, toilet roll, incontinence products and other basic items and prioritise them for older/at risk individuals and carers
Pharmacies
– Proactively phone/text local customers to advise them of delivery services if they are in at-risk categories.
– Consider whether medication could be provided in daily pill dispensers as standard for anyone in an at-risk category
– Sending regular reminders to known customers to not attend to collect medication if they are displaying any symptoms
– If you need any more information about how someone with dementia might need support visit Dementia Friends or Alzheimer’s Society

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